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You can use the form on the right to contact Deborah Lee Rose.

613 Ahwahnee Court
Walnut Creek, CA, 94596
United States

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QUOTES FROM SCIENTISTS IN SCIENTISTS GET DRESSED

“When the biology teacher had us explore the natural areas right outside our school, suddenly I saw things right under my nose that I had never noticed before. I realized then that I didn’t even know what I didn’t know—and I wanted to discover more.”
—Lucy Rose, freshwater chemist, University of Minnesota

“I enjoy being out in the field especially in challenging physical environments, but what I do is only worthwhile if there’s an outcome that improves people’s lives.”
—Adrian McCallum, glaciologist and geotechnical engineer, University of the Sunshine Coast

“The brain is the most complex mass of protoplasm on this Earth. It only weighs 3 pounds, but it has the capacity to conceive of a universe a billion light-years across. Isn't that phenomenal?”
—Marian Diamond, pioneering brain scientist, UC Berkeley

“The August 1978 National Geographic had a cover article on dinosaurs. I was three years old, and it was love at first sight. Paleontology is a hands-on science. You have to get your hands dirty, and the dirtier—the farther you get into the science.”
Mathew Wedel, paleontologist, Western University of Health Sciences

“Most of the injured and sick raptors I take care of have been harmed by human activity. Wearing my gloves, I can release them back into the wild, and become the human who gives them a second chance.”
—Janie Veltkamp, raptor biologist, Birds of Prey Northwest, Idaho

“Learning to climb trees high into the forest canopy, and using a microscope to study tiny forest organisms, taught me that a wheelchair doesn’t have to prevent me from exploring the great outdoors or contributing to our knowledge of the natural world.”
—Rebecca Tripp, forest canopy conservation biologist

“My parents told me I was always fascinated by wild animals as a child. I think it was a natural progression for me to pursue a career in wildlife biology because it fed my fascination, while at the same time provided me an opportunity to study and help those that were threatened.”
—Bill Moore, ecologist, National Park Service

“Standing on most volcanoes, I have a sense of presence and power, and a constant reminder that what I'm standing on either once erupted or will again—or both. Science isn't all glamorous field work. It takes patience and more than a bit of stubbornness!”
—Jessica Ball, volcanologist, US Geological Survey

Glaciologist/geotechnical engineer Adrian McCallum may wear four pairs of mittens to keep his hands from freezing in extreme cold.  Photo: Courtesy of Martin Hartley Photography

Glaciologist/geotechnical engineer Adrian McCallum may wear four pairs of mittens to keep his hands from freezing in extreme cold.
Photo: Courtesy of Martin Hartley Photography

Waterproof gloves and chest waders keep freshwater chemist Lucy Rose’s hands and body dry and warm, even in an icy stream.   Photo: Ethan Pawlowski (c) Lucy Rose

Waterproof gloves and chest waders keep freshwater chemist Lucy Rose’s hands and body dry and warm, even in an icy stream.
Photo: Ethan Pawlowski (c) Lucy Rose

A climbing harness, gloves to grab pull ropes, and helmet help Rebecca Tripp safely reach the high forest canopy to study that ecosystem.  Photo: (c) William R. Miller, used by permission

A climbing harness, gloves to grab pull ropes, and helmet help Rebecca Tripp safely reach the high forest canopy to study that ecosystem.
Photo: (c) William R. Miller, used by permission