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13-HR Lucy Rose arm in frozen pond.JPG

SCIENTISTS GET DRESSED GLOVE CHALLENGE/STEM ACTIVITY

SCIENTISTS GET DRESSED GLOVE CHALLENGE HANDS-ON STEM ACTIVITY

FIND THE FULL ACTIVITY IN THE NEW CHILDREN’S BOOK SCIENTISTS GET DRESSED by Deborah Lee Rose
Published by Persnickety Press/Wundermill Book
(All photos from the book)
Activity (c) Deborah Lee Rose—free use permitted for free educational purposes

WHY DO SCIENTISTS WEAR GLOVES?
To protect their hands from freezing or burning, getting cut or scraped, or being exposed to germs or chemicals

To keep germs or dirt on their hands from reaching patients, lab samples or sensitive pieces of equipment

WHAT KINDS OF GLOVES DO SCIENTISTS WEAR?
All kinds!

ACTIVITY THEME AND PURPOSE
If you were a scientist, what gloves would YOU wear?
Try different tasks wearing different kinds of gloves and using different kinds of tools.

Which gloves work best with which tools and
tasks? Why?

CHALLENGE EXTENSION from glaciologist/geotechnical engineer Adrian McCallum
Test different gloves by timing yourself to see how long it takes to button or zip your coat or jacket, depending on your gloves. On a space mission or in regions like the Arctic and Antarctica, how fast scientists and engineers get dressed is critical to their safety and survival.

Glaciologist/geotechnical engineer Adrian McCallum sometimes wears four pairs of mittens to keep his hands from freezing in the world’s coldest places.  Photo credit: Courtesy of Martin Hartley Photography

Glaciologist/geotechnical engineer Adrian McCallum sometimes wears four pairs of mittens to keep his hands from freezing in the world’s coldest places.
Photo credit: Courtesy of Martin Hartley Photography

Waterproof gloves and chest waders keep freshwater chemist Lucy Rose’s hands and body dry and warm in an icy stream.   Photo credit: Ethan Pawlowski (c) Lucy Rose

Waterproof gloves and chest waders keep freshwater chemist Lucy Rose’s hands and body dry and warm in an icy stream.
Photo credit: Ethan Pawlowski (c) Lucy Rose

Raptor biologist Janie Veltkamp wears puncture-proof gloves lined with Kevlar, stronger and lighter than steel, to carry and care for Beauty the Bald Eagle and other raptors.  Photo credit: Glen Hush, © Jane Veltkamp

Raptor biologist Janie Veltkamp wears puncture-proof gloves lined with Kevlar, stronger and lighter than steel, to carry and care for Beauty the Bald Eagle and other raptors.
Photo credit: Glen Hush, © Jane Veltkamp